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Oshe and Shere Shango

Oshe and Shere Shango

The ‘shere’ rattle and the ‘oshe’ double-axe are the typical instruments for the Shango worshippers.

Ifa gbe wa ooo!

Ifa gbe wa ooo!

"Ifa gbe wa ooo" is Yoruba language for "Ifa support us!" The drawing shows a divination tray painted with indigo dye.

Awo

Awo

"Awo" is Yoruba language for "secret" or also used to name initiated Olorisha and Ifa priests. It is part of "babalawo", literally "father who has the secret".

Oore Yeye ooo!

Oore Yeye ooo!

This is the greeting for Orisha Oshun, in English it means "kindness of the mother"!

Omi ooo!

Omi ooo!

"Omi òòò!" is the Yoruba greeting for water deities, in the diaspora it is often used for the Orisha Yemoja. 

Ogun Mariwo

Ogun Mariwo

Mariwo, split plamfrond, is used in Yorubaland to mark ritual spots and taboo zones. Entry at your own risk! 

Obaluaye Broom

Obaluaye Broom

One of the hottest Orisha! The broom is used by initiated priests to clear and purify people and spaces from sickness. 

Oba Koso

Oba Koso

This image unites many Shango symbols: braided hair, shere-rattle, double-axe, shoulder bag, thunderstones and the dance skirt. 

Afrocuban Oshosi

Afrocuban Oshosi

Oshosi is Ogun's brother and an important warrior and hunter Orisha. His tools are the very precise bow and the arrows.

Afrocuban Obatala

Afrocuban Obatala

Obatala's name “ọbà tí álá” means "the king of white cloth". Obatala is the supreme Orisha. As the deity of peace, harmony, mercy and purity he is kind and benevolent.

Afrocuban Babaluaye

Afrocuban Babaluaye

Babaluaye is Yoruba for “father whose reign is the physical earth”. He is feared and known as the Orisha of infectious diseases, feverish infections and epidemics and the healing force.

Bata-drums

Bata-drums

An Afrocuban set of bata-drums consists of the small drum Okonkolo, the lead-drum Iya and the middle-sized Itotele. Traditionally in Havana they are made of rawhide only. 

Ere Obatala

Ere Obatala

Obatala literally means "King of white cloth". This drawing shows a traditional sacred statue of the Orisha, called "ere", carved out of wood and painted with white chalk, "efun".

Odide

Odide

Initiations into Orisha-worship make use of a red tailfeather of the African grey parrot, called Odide in Yoruba-language. It is a strong protection against witchcraft.

Ejife

Ejife

Cuban Olorisha use parted coconuts instead of kola nuts to divine. "Ejife" is the most positive sign of the oracle, it says “si, seguro, too bien, tienes ire”.  

Ogun Aladaa Meji

Ogun Aladaa Meji

Ogun’s praise name “Aladaa Meji” means “the one with two cutlasses”. It shows his warrior attitude as the god of iron and civilization. 

Ejire

Ejire

Obi, Yoruba for kolanuts, are used to communicate with Orisha. In divination they are cast and interpreted, this one is the most positive sign.